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Emulsifying and Antioxidant Properties of Polysaccharide Extract from Seaweeds

Ms., Sharon (2010) Emulsifying and Antioxidant Properties of Polysaccharide Extract from Seaweeds. [Student Project Report]

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Abstract

This Dissertation / Report is the outcome of investigation carried out by the creator(s) / author(s) at the department/division of Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI), Mysore mentioned below in this page.

Item Type: Student Project Report
Additional Information: Seaweeds are consumed as food in various forms as salad, soups, pickle with sauce, sweetened, pasta jellies. The food uses of alginates as thickening agents in sauces, syrups and toppings for ice creams, pie fillings, cake mixes and canned meat and vegetables. Alginates are the basis of many slimming diet foods, particularly biscuits. Gel formation of alginates leads to uses in instant milk desserts and jellies, bakery filling cream, fruit pies, animal foods and reformed fruit, stabilize bear foam or the suspended solids in fruit drinks. Alginates are being used to make improve rice pasta and vegetable pasta. Seaweed carrageenan and agar are used as thickening and gelling agents in food, pastry, yoghurts, chocolate milk and medium for microorganisms. Sulphated polysaccharides from seaweeds have been used in the films that are placed between bones to be grafted in order to accelerate the growth of the connective tissue. The polysaccharides are also used to treat arthritis, as they are active in promoting and aiding the healing process of the body. The recent application of polysaccharide for the immobilization of biological catalyst in the industrial processes is one of the greatest prospects in modern biotechnology. The uses of seaweed phycocolloids as emulsifier in dairy products, leather, textile and pharmaceutical industries have been well recognized. Seaweeds have been utilized mainly as raw material for extraction of Phycocolloids as Alginates from Brown macro algae, agar and carrageen from red macro algae The seaweeds are known to contain bioactive products which display anti antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties Furthermore, they are used as animal nutrition feed, fertilizers and soil conditioning agents. Seaweeds are considered a great source of polysaccharides, 54 which have attained commercial significance due to their physical properties such as gelling, water-retention and their ability to emulsify Seaweeds contain large amount of cell wall structural polysaccharides. Hydrocolloids and phyllocolloids are of polysaccharides extracted from seaweeds which are carbohydrates that dissolve in water to give viscous solutions. Reports are available on the anti oxidative potential of different seaweeds mainly from the waters of China, Korea and Japan Polyphenolic extracts from seaweeds are shown to possess anticancerous effects The free radical scavenging activity of polysaccharide extracts particularly the sulphated polysaccharides laminarin and beta-glucans, fucoidan, from seaweeds has been demonstrated Brown seaweeds are used to produce three hydrocolloids agar, alginate and carrageenan. Alginate, agar and carrageenan are water soluble carbohydrates that are used to thicken aqueous solution, to form gels of varying degrees of firmness to form water soluble films and to stabilize some products such as ice creams.Sulphated polysaccharides from seaweeds have been used in the films that are placed between bones to be grafted in order to accelerate the growth of the connective tissue. The polysaccharides are also used to treat arthritis, as they are active in promoting and aiding the healing process of the body. The recent application of polysaccharide for the immobilization of biological catalyst in the industrial processes is one of the greatest prospects in modern biotechnology. The uses of seaweed phycocolloids as emulsifier in dairy products, leather, textile and pharmaceutical industries have been well recognized. Against this background studies were conducted to evaluate the emulsification and antioxidant properties of crude polysaccharides extracted from different Inidan seaweeds 55 and Japanese seaweeds to explore them for the possible use as functional ingredients in food products.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Indian seaweeds; emulsification; antioxidant properties; crude polysaccharides; functional ingredients; food products
Subjects: 500 Natural Sciences and Mathematics > 07 Life Sciences > 04 Microbiology > 01 Algae
600 Technology > 08 Food technology > 32 Antioxidants
Divisions: Meat Fish and Poultry Technology
Depositing User: Food Sci. & Technol. Information Services
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2010 07:19
Last Modified: 28 Dec 2011 10:15
URI: http://ir.cftri.com/id/eprint/9518

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