[feed] Atom [feed] RSS 1.0 [feed] RSS 2.0

Enzymatic modification as a tool to improve the functional properties of heat-processed soy flour

Radha, C. and Ramesh Kumar, Parigi and Prakash, V. (2008) Enzymatic modification as a tool to improve the functional properties of heat-processed soy flour. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 88. pp. 336-343.

[img] PDF
J_Sci_Food_Agric_88_336-343_(2008).pdf
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (342kB)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There are a number of antinutritional factors present in soybeans that exert a negative impact on the nutritional quality of the protein. Among those factors that are destroyed by heat treatment are protease inhibitors and lectins. Protease inhibitors show antinutritional effect and moreover the digestibility of the protein is limited by the presence of these antinutrients. The aims of the present study are (1) to study the effect of autoclaving on the trypsin inhibitor inactivation, nitrogen solubility and protein digestibility of defatted soy flour and (2) to study the effect of enzymatic modification on the functional properties of autoclaved soy flour. RESULTS: The solubility of the soy flour decreased with increase in autoclaving time. Partial hydrolysis of the autoclaved soy flour increased its acid solubility (pH 4.5) from 17% to 56% over a control value of 24% without affecting its functional properties. Inactivation of trypsin inhibitors improved the protein digestibility of soy flour from 25% to 95%. Particle size analysis of the autoclaved flour indicated the formation of soy protein aggregates, which resulted in poor solubility. The enzymatic modification of autoclaved soy flour resulted in its property as a good emulsifying agent with an emulsion capacity of 118 ± 4mL. CONCLUSION: Enzymatic modification of the heat-processed soy flour increased its solubility and other functional attributes. The increased acid solubility would be advantageous in the utilization of soy proteins in acidic foods. Thus the autoclaved and partially modified soy flour is a potential source for specific functional foods.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: BACKGROUND: There are a number of antinutritional factors present in soybeans that exert a negative impact on the nutritional quality of the protein. Among those factors that are destroyed by heat treatment are protease inhibitors and lectins. Protease inhibitors show antinutritional effect and moreover the digestibility of the protein is limited by the presence of these antinutrients. The aims of the present study are (1) to study the effect of autoclaving on the trypsin inhibitor inactivation, nitrogen solubility and protein digestibility of defatted soy flour and (2) to study the effect of enzymatic modification on the functional properties of autoclaved soy flour. RESULTS: The solubility of the soy flour decreased with increase in autoclaving time. Partial hydrolysis of the autoclaved soy flour increased its acid solubility (pH 4.5) from 17% to 56% over a control value of 24% without affecting its functional properties. Inactivation of trypsin inhibitors improved the protein digestibility of soy flour from 25% to 95%. Particle size analysis of the autoclaved flour indicated the formation of soy protein aggregates, which resulted in poor solubility. The enzymatic modification of autoclaved soy flour resulted in its property as a good emulsifying agent with an emulsion capacity of 118 ± 4mL. CONCLUSION: Enzymatic modification of the heat-processed soy flour increased its solubility and other functional attributes. The increased acid solubility would be advantageous in the utilization of soy proteins in acidic foods. Thus the autoclaved and partially modified soy flour is a potential source for specific functional foods.
Subjects: 600 Technology > 08 Food technology > 22 Legumes-Pulses > 05 Soya bean
600 Technology > 08 Food technology > 16 Nutritive value
Divisions: Protein Chemistry and Technology
Depositing User: Food Sci. & Technol. Information Services
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2008 09:49
Last Modified: 30 Apr 2012 09:28
URI: http://ir.cftri.com/id/eprint/8695

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item