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The net protein utilization and the protein efficiency ratio of seame proteins supplemented with lysine to levels present in FAO reference protein pattern and milk.

Joseph, A. A. and Tasker, P. K. and Kantha, Joseph and Narayana Rao, M. and Swaminathan, M. and Sankaran, A. N. and Sreenivasan, A. and Subrahmanyan, V. (1962) The net protein utilization and the protein efficiency ratio of seame proteins supplemented with lysine to levels present in FAO reference protein pattern and milk. Annals of Biochemistry and Experimental Medicine, 22 (5). pp. 113-116. (In Press)

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Abstract

The recent report of FAO Committee on protein requirements has stressed on the need for taking into consideration the essential amino-acid content and nutritive value of the proteins in the diet for estimating human protein requirements (1). Based on the available information on the amino-acid requirements of children and adults, the same body recommended a 'reference protein pattern' which could serve as a standard for comparison in assessing the quality of dietary protein. The provisional pattern differed from the amino-acid composition of milk or egg proteins in that it contained lesser amounts of all essential aminoacids except those containing sulphur and tryptophan. The 'reference' protein pattern was assigned a "protein score" of 100. As compared with this, the corresponding values for the proteins of egg and milk will be 100 and 78 respectively based on their essential amino-acid composition indicating that milk proteins are inferior to the reference protein pattern. This conclusion is at variance with the results obtained by others (2, 3) later on.. Howe et al. (2) reported that the protein efficiency ratio of amino-acid mixture having a composition similar to that of FAO reference protein pattern was less than that of casein. Joseph et al. (3) reported that a blend of sesame meal and milk powder having an amino-acid pattern similar to that of reference protein pattern had a PER of 2·44 (during a 4-week growth period), which was significantly less than that (3·O2) of milk proteins. Platt et al. (4) reported that the protein scores calculated according to FAO reference pattern corresponded well with the net protein utilization values (NPU) of the dietary proteins. No information is available in the literature on the NPU of protein blends having a composition similar to that of FAO reference protein pattern even though the value has been assumed to be nearly 100. Sesame proteins are good sources of all essential amino-acids except lysine, the reported NPU being 57(5) and the protein score calculated from the amino-acid composition (lysine content 2·8%) according to FAO Committee (1) is 66. In the present investigations, the NPU and PER of sesame meal proteins fortified with /-lysine to levels present in FAO reference protein pattern and in milk proteins have been studied.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: protein requirements, sesame meal, milk powder, lysine
Subjects: 600 Technology > 08 Food technology > 16 Nutritive value > 03 Proteins
Divisions: Dept. of Biochemistry
Depositing User: Food Sci. & Technol. Information Services
Date Deposited: 23 Jul 2012 06:44
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2012 06:44
URI: http://ir.cftri.com/id/eprint/6048

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