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Occurrence and distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and Lactobacillus spp. from Indian poultry: in vivo transferability of their erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin resistance.

Preethi, Chandran and Surya Chandra Rao, Thumu and Prakash, M. Halami (2017) Occurrence and distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and Lactobacillus spp. from Indian poultry: in vivo transferability of their erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin resistance. Annals of Microbiology, 67. pp. 395-404.

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence and distribution of antibiotic resistant (AR) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Indian poultry. LAB from poultry farm feces (n = 21) and samples from slaughter houses comprising chicken intestine (n = 46), raw meat (n = 23), and sanitary water (n = 4) were evaluated and compared with those from organic chicken (OC) collected from nearby villages. Screening studies showed 5–7 log units higher erythromycin (ER), tetracycline (TC) and vancomycin (VAN) resistant LAB from conventional poultry chicken (CC) compared to OC. Molecular characterization of isolated cultures (n = 32) with repetitive-PCR profiling and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed their taxonomical status as Enterococcus faecium (n = 16), Enterococcus durans (n = 2), Lactobacillus plantarum (n = 10), Lactobacillus pentosus (n = 1) and Lactobacillus salivarius (n = 3). The isolates were found to harbor erm(B), msr(C), msr(A/B), tet(M), tet(L) and tet(K) genes associated with Tn916 and Tn917 family transposons. Expression studies through real-time PCR revealed antibioticinduced expression of the identified AR genes. In vitro and in vivo conjugational studies revealed transfer of ER and TC resistant (ERR and TCR) genes with transfer frequencies of 10−7 and 10−4 transconjugants recipient−1, respectively. Although no known VAN resistance (VANR) genes were detected, high phenotypic resistance was observed and was transferable to the recipient. From a public health point of view, this study reports Indian poultry as a major source of high levels of AR bacteria contaminating the food chain and the environment. Thus, urgent and determined strategies are needed to control the spread of multiple AR bacteria.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antibiotic resistance . Horizontal gene transfer . Poultry . Enterococcus . Lactobacillus
Subjects: 500 Natural Sciences and Mathematics > 07 Life Sciences > 04 Microbiology > 02 Bacteriology
600 Technology > 08 Food technology > 28 Meat, Fish & Poultry
Divisions: Food Microbiology
Depositing User: Food Sci. & Technol. Information Services
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2017 10:51
Last Modified: 04 Jul 2017 10:51
URI: http://ir.cftri.com/id/eprint/12756

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